Does Floating LNG Processing make sense for the GoM?


#1

The first FLNG converted from an older LNG carrier is getting ready to leave Keppel Shipyard in Singapore for Cameroon in West Africa: https://www.maritime-executive.com/article/keppel-readies-worlds-first-flng-conversion

Would this make sense for fast track development in the GoM? Supply of wet gas could be either from offshore or onshore sources, or even from a combination of both.

The time to build onshore LNG processing facilities could take 2-3 years, as compared to as little as 18 months for a conversion.

Besides, it would be hard to find a place along the GoM coast to locate a shore based facility with capability to export LNG via the largest VLNGCs now in existence, or under development.

PS> The worlds largest floating structure, the FLNG Prelude has just left the yard in Korea and is on it;s way to the field off NW Australia, where it will operate for 20 - 25 years w/o the need for drydocking: http://www.shell.com.au/about-us/projects-and-locations/prelude-flng/prelude-flng-journey-to-australia.html

PPS> The FLNG Prelude will NOT be disconnectable, although situated in an area with frequent Tropical Cyclones. She will be permanently moored with 16 anchors and chains and connected to the subsea facilities by 4 flexible risers: http://www.technip.com/en/press/technip-awarded-subsea-contract-shell’s-prelude-flng-development#