Different regional US maritime dialects


#21

The announcement for getting out of the rack is “heave out” as in “Reveille! Reveille! All hands heave out and trice up” , trice up originally meaning to secure your hammock but now just part of the reveille pipe/


#22

When I stood BMOW watch on a DDG, we had to ask permission of the OOD to “Strike Below” whenever we were relieved of watch.


#23

When I was in Sea Scouts on San Francisco Bay the section of the Pacific just outside the Golden Gate was (and AFAIK still is) known as Potato Patch Shoals. Once in a while we had the privilege of being escorted out there by a USCG cutter, to show us what a real ocean was like. Since our vessel was a converted spoonbill bow Higgins Boat with an acre of windage it could be one hell of a ride.

Cheers,

Earl


#24

I had never heard this used any way other than “lay aloft” so I looked it up. I’m unsure how this usage of “lay” came about but it’s interesting nonetheless. (See definition 8.)


#25

Are you complaining about the world famous line handlers in Virginia. Many years ago a major ship line manager made the statement that the linehandlers were the worst in the world. Management and ila were in a uproar. It takes forever to get a container ship with 6 people with 2 forklifts but for a coal ship with 4 people non-union by hand do it in half the time


#26

No I’m just saying that the “ship’s work” is not pronounced, just understood.


#27

Lay to, Turn to, Turn in, … I didn’t think it was old or antiquated… I really like John Wayne in “Hatari” when he yells to Red Buttons… “knock on it” …well, it could of been Swahili but it meant FLOOR IT!


#28

I worked with one old dude whose parting shot was “I’ll see ya downstream.”