Different regional US maritime dialects


#1

It’s doesn’t seem to be widely used, I tell the mate lets leave it hooked up till we get to the turn I get a puzzled look.

I had a captain start giving me a hard time for describing the sea as “lumpy”, which I heard a lot working in Alaska, it’s after the low has passed and the winds come down but the sea is still running, usually confused, “still a little lumpy”


What Merchant Mariners See In You
#2

Here in the Mid-Atlantic east coast I have certainly heard the term “hook it up” for full ahead. Examples: "I should be able to make my ETA, I’ve got her hooked up. As soon as you are over on the port side and have a line up, hook her up. I’m on a short hawser but as soon as I can put out more cable, I will hook her up. etc.

An odd one I have heard docking pilots use in Hampton Roads (for 30 years) is the term “rumble” meaning the stern of a ship being docked / un-docked. Example: “Tug A.J., I want you to get a line up on the rumble.” I always supposed that it referred to a 1930 's era Sport Coupe.


#3

I must not have worked in Norfolk long enough to hear that gem. Possibly it’s a derivative of definition 3.


#4

I’ve also never heard this in the Hampton Roads area, though I’ll be there next week so I’ll keep my ears open or better yet ask the docking master.

Most of my dockings in Norfolk, at least where the line handlers are concerned, are more akin to choice #5. A street fight between teenagers.:rofl:


#5

Lets let it soak.

Been hearing that here in the NW, mostly around the construction sites.

Basically letting things drift.

Soakage is what is happening


#6

“Let it soak” is a common term used on rigs and barges with spread mooring. When running anchors on locations with doubtful holding ground it is common to let the anchor “soak” for a while to let them dig in properly.
It is especially common if an anchor slips when “cross testing” (pre-tensioning) and are re-run.
The term “Soaking Anchor(s)” are even used in the log book and Rig move Report.


#7

“Make a good move” is one you hear a lot in the northeast. Basically “yeah you can cross ahead if you kick it in the ass”


#8

“Give it another hundred” (RPMs) is something heard on the radio in SC.


#9

One term I remember hearing back in them days was; “Clocking good time”, meaning making good speed.
Is that still in use??
I’m racking my brain for more from way back when.


#10

I’ve run into a couple of areas the locals call “the potato patch” where the seas are “lumpy”. One is in the channel between the islands of Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa off of Point Conception known for being lumpy because of confused currents,


#11

Obviously used everywhere, but I haven’t been able to pin down an exact answer… Does anyone know where the term “turn to” originated from?


#12

#13

You gonna have to divert all power from the rice cooker to the WiFi there’s multiple episodes of some of those.


#14

This isn’t in regards to anchor drills. In this regard it just means to let whatever we are shifting, drift.
No power, no rudder. It’s pilebuck slang

ombugge Top Contributer
November 23 |

“Let it soak” is a common term used on rigs and barges with spread mooring. When running anchors on locations with doubtful holding ground it is common to let the anchor “soak” for a while to let them dig in properly.
It is especially common if an anchor slips when “cross testing” (pre-tensioning) and are re-run.
The term “Soaking Anchor(s)” are even used in the log book and Rig move Report.


#15

When I was in the service “Turn To” was short for now turn to ships work


#16

Outside the service “turn to” just means to go to work.
“It’s time to turn to”


#17

Don’t you love the way the mental midgets they have handling lines in Hampton Roads feel qualified to tell you how you should be tying up your ship!


#18

In the Navy a formal announcement is made “now, turn to ship’s work” the meaning is that it’s time to go to work. In the navy there is also an informal expression “turn to” which means the same thing.

Are you saying outside of the Navy the expression “turn to”, meaning time to go to work is not related and is just a coincidence?


#19

I thought “turn to” was just old nautical English for getting out of your rack in general. Like the still common english phrase of, “turn in,” ex; “I’m turning in for the night.”

Another archaic nautical phrase. “Lay [whereever you want the person to go]” ex; “You there, Lay aloft and prepare to strike sail.” , “Lay aft and report to the officer on watch.”

When I think of “Nautical English”, especially if I were to teach it to High Schoolers, I’d think of mostly these kinds of traditional words. Terms such as port, starboard, aloft, below, bulkhead, bow, stern, greenhorn. Some archaic, some in contemporary use. I wouldn’t really think of too many modern industry terms or phrases though.

EDIT: Darn this should’ve been my reply in his other topic. Not really in this one, whatever.


#20

I heard the CG use it a few years ago while at one of their shore bases. - “So and so, lay to the mess deck”.