Costa Concordia Captain's Sentence Upheld by Italy Court


#1

https://www-bbc-co-uk.cdn.ampproject.org/c/www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/39903968


#2

From gCaptain’s text >>> http://gcaptain.com/costa-concordia-captain-heads-prison-italy-upholds-conviction/

His lawyer said he might appeal to the European Court of Human Rights. “I think there have been serious abuses here,” Senese said. “I never give up.” and
Schettino’s defense team contended that he prevented an even worse disaster by steering the ship close to the island as it sank.”

The ship was dead in the water, drifting without propulsion or rudder. If not, Schettino would certainly have tried to beach the ship at the sandy coast of Italy, 15 NM away… and then capsized in the channel with depths of >100 meters and an enormous death toll.
Only the Lord’s meteorological department blew the ship almost into the small Giglio port.

And:
“The massive, rusting hulk of the Costa Concordia was left abandoned on its side for two-and-a-half years before it was towed away in the most expensive maritime wreck recovery in history”

Abandoned?
For more than a billion $, during 2 years, they built an artificial, horizontal bottom on the steep and rocky slope of Giglio island to upright the wreck. Then they built a ‘ship around the dead ship’ to refloat the wreck and to tow it away.


#3

Captain Coward is going to appeal to yet another court. What is wrong with this guy? He really is shameless and clearly a mental case. I am afraid that once again this desperate action reflects badly on the entire shipping industry.


#4

my God! if there ever was a better case for shooting a miserable SOB at dawn, I sure would like to hear of it?

I’ll gladly put the gun to the back of his head and smile as I pull the trigger


#5

This low life, after the stranding, changed into plain clothes, his civvies, in his cabin and then he mingled unnoticed with his passengers to so escape in stealth mode as one of the first the ship by falling, he stumbled he said, ‘accidentally’ into a lifeboat, hence the qualification Captain Coward. Quite an example beyond the borders of bravery. And even now he is claiming that he saved many lives by his astute actions. OMG…

Why could he walk around in total freedom for two years before putting him finally behind iron bars only just now?


#6

Lol. I can’t wait till Anders Bjorkman sees all this…he will have choice words for yall!


#7

I wonder how Schettino would score on a personality test for narcissistic personality disorder and what kind of screening he got before being promoted to captain?

As far as his behavior after the wreck, what’s the standard here? I recall years ago seeing a photo of a captain of a grounded tanker that had caused a major spill curled up in fetal position under his bunk. Perhaps being the cause of a major disaster and having to deal with the aftermath is too much stress for some people.

How many poster here have dealt with that much stress? None.


#8

I’m not sure you meant to frame a parallel or not but almost daily for the past 4 months we have watched this same bit of theater play out right here in America.

Unfortunately, I don’t think the outcome will be half as satisfying and the human cost will be far far greater before the curtain falls.


#9

I’m not sure you meant to frame a parallel or not but almost daily for the past 4 months we have watched this same bit of theater play out right here in America.

You don’t mean this do you?


#10

[quote=“Kennebec_Captain, post:7, topic:44919, full:true”] …How many poster here have dealt with that much stress? None.
[/quote]

http://forum.gcaptain.com/t/el-faro-what-was-the-captain-thinking-is-the-wrong-question/43311/16?u=urs


#11

What has that got to do with anything?

Just because they may not post here doesn’t mean that hundreds or maybe even thousands of soldiers, doctors, pilots, ship captains, and maybe even grocery store managers don’t deal with that kind of stress at some point in their career and don’t fold like wet cardboard under the load.

We rarely hear about any but the failures and (fortunately) there are damned few of them.


#12

Have no illusions of a long prison sentence for CC. In Italy they have to serve, with good behaviour, only one third of the sentence. In my country this is a little better, two third. This means that he is out in five years time.

As they had the stupidity not to revoke his license he may be back in business in a couple of years. This guy should be prevented for life to board any ship at any time.


#13

I feel sorry that such an accident had to happen in this day and age (exactly 100 years after the Titanic)

The charge as I understand is ‘criminally negligent manslaughter’, i.e. where death has resulted from serious negligence, or, serious recklessness- wherein lies the majority of sentence for 15 years. 1 year is for abandoning the ship ahead of evacuating the rest of the ship.

Every moment working at sea needs requires due diligence, intense focus, foresight, prudence, and an ability to respond effectively should things not go as per plan. How to prevent the next CC from happening?

I share some practical strategies in my book Golden Stripes- Leadership on the High Seas.


#14

Schettino’s defense team contended that he prevented an even worse disaster by steering the ship close to the island as it sank.

From the gcaptain article.

I read somewhere that the vessel lost all power and steerage after the collision with the rock, and it was the effect of the wind and current that brought it into the shallow water so it didn’t fully sink. So he could be lying when he says he steered it close to land.


#15

He’ll make a good ammount of money from rich people paying him to speak at events and book deals.


#16

He may believe it himself. I wonder what advice his lawyer gave him and if he followed it. He might have been better off legally if he had said the was not in control of the ship and that he panicked after the grounding.


#17

I have summarised the report from the Italian Marine Casualties body here: http://www.shipsandoil.co.uk/accident-reports-introduction/the-costa-concordia-accident . It still makes quite interesting reading and actually it appears that company may well have condoned close approaches by its ships to land. The Costa Concordia had more or less followed the same course on a number of previous occasions. And in the end we have to consider whether an error of judgement should end up with the imprisonment of those who had made the error, whether followed by other failings or not. Those of us who have commanded ships - oh hang on, I did not command a ship I was only in charge of a mud boat - would like to think we would have acted correctly in all emergencies, but in reality who knows.


#18

In a plea bargain, these five persons accepted prison terms of less than 3 years (I have not seen the written sentences).

From the bridge team: the first mate, the third mate and the helmsman.
From the ship: the hotel manager.
From Costa Cruises, shore side: the fleet crisis coordinator.

That was before the first instance of the Schettino trial started.


#19

It’s bullshit that the helmsman had to plead to anything.


#20

At about 2141… Finally when giving orders to put the rudders to port the helmsman makes an error and puts them to starboard, but corrects himself and goes hard aport, the correction taking eight seconds.

At 2145 the Second Officer warns that the ship has gone aground, and there is a loud crash.

I’m sure they could figure out in a simulator if steering to starboard instead of port for for 8 seconds 4 minutes before going aground would have made any difference to the vessel going aground or not. I’m almost certain it would have made zero difference, giving him jail time is bullshit.