Cooking at Sea


#109

Had a cook once that cooked bacon in the deep-fat fryer. Does that make the list? Though his nickname was “butt-crack Mike” so I guess we should have expected stuff like that.


#110

Fascinating. How were the results, other than getting bacon grease in the fryer?


#112

Meh, greasier than usual. There were only a couple folks that ate it after seeing how he did it, and yeah, you really didn’t want to eat anything out of the fryer after that either. He did do a good gumbo though, I’ll give him that. But I ate a lot of ramen and hot pockets the short time I was stuck on there.


#113

I put up a short bonus video-


#114

My mom taught me how to separate eggs by pouring back and forth between shell halves. But Joy of Cooking ca. 1970 says just pour it in your hand and let the white run out between your fingers.


#115

The first video I did on this shows the way your mom taught you. The bottle was a new technique to me. I’m not sold that your crew would want to see the egg running through your fingers haha.


#116

If there is any special content someone wants to see on Facebook, let me know.


#117

A suggestion:
The National/Southern Food & Beverage Museum has a dedicated cookbook library, The John & Bonnie Boyd Hospitality & Culinary Library in New Orleans. It has over 16,000 cookbooks which are listed in the New Orleans Public Library catalog. It has the cookbook collections of a number of famous chefs including Paul Prudhomme, and all its books are donated. This is where I found the Navy cookbook.
You might want to send a copy of your creation to them to be included in this reference library.


#118

Thanks!


#119

The author of Joy of Cooking was very outspoken about not being afraid to handle food. In light of which I’ll mention that those alcohol hand disinfectants will leave a nasty bitter taste on your hands – it’s put in there to discourage people from drinking the stuff.


#120

I hear you. I just think alternating your yolk from one shell to the other has a better presentation factor in the galley than running your egg through your fingers, especially when 3 or 4 people are sitting at the table watching you. Just my opinion. I’m no joy of cooking expert, but I’d venture to say if he was on a tugboat they would find him a nickname pretty quick. Haha


#121

The Dutch Royal Navy has a very complete, 298 pages 1018 recipes, Indonesian cookbook with also some Chinese and Surinam recipes. Traditionally a lot of Indonesian food is served as a result of our once Dutch Colonies where a heavy presence of the Navy was required to patrol the vast area with thousands of islands. Every Wednesday they still serve an Indonesian rice table with up to 20 main and side dishes.


#122

One of the things I used to love to eat when I was in Rotterdam was a rijsttafel. . . great food. Almost as good as the food in Indonesia, and most Chinese restaurants that I went to had a version.


#123


My proof copy came today.


#124

Watch “Unboxing My Book! (proof copy)” on YouTube


#125

Watch “Wildlife at Sea from Cooking at Sea” on YouTube


#126

You might enjoy playing with a circular-polarizing filter. It will kill reflections off the water and let you look down better.


#127

Thanks good to know!


#128

With polarizer set for maximum effect (depends on lighting):

With polarizer removed or set for minimum effect:


#129

This might seem basic to a lot of people, but I thought it might help.