ATBs at Harley Marine


#21

uh because this one was cheap and it’s a atb!!! Good thing they are building 2 more…


#22

[QUOTE=rshrew;163171]uh because this one was cheap and it’s a atb!!! Good thing they are building 2 more…[/QUOTE]

It would appear your company doesn’t have any issue designing a nice looking, and very functional ship. You need an engineer for that new beauty sitting in the yard yet? Or has it been launched now?


#23

boats designed by people that work on them what a concept huh, we are always looking for good folks


#24

Just curious what are some of the bone head things at mac/moran?


#25

[QUOTE=rshrew;163175]boats designed by people that work on them what a concept huh, we are always looking for good folks[/QUOTE]

Shersberry sent his kid to a maritime school, not business school, that should tell you someting about the mindset there. Most companies are run by bean counters.


#26

giant stacks obstructing visibility, winch controls right where your elbow would be when steering, jon-rie winches, less than 4 state rooms, one head, crap like that. Overall terrible wheelhouse layouts. Ridiculous you need to slide the seat out to get to/away from controls. You should be able to walk around the console. Oh yeah “tugboats” without even a capstan! Also the newest Mac boats have the fi-fi in front of the fwd wheelhouse widows; resulting in 10-12" piping taking up accommodation space.


#27

Thats all interesting stuff. MorAn seems to improve on the vessels each time they order a new one so you gotta give them credit for listening to the guys. Funny you mention the rie winches. Talked with some guys at vane and they were a bit frustrated with them.


#28

I dont understand why mcallister doesn’t start some kind of ATB new build program. I saw they had a container ATB on the drawing board.


#29

Here’s a good one: when you build a boat, and it comes time to design the rooms a normal person would say hey, what size is a standard twin mattress, I am going to design the rooms around that. First it’s cheaper to buy a mattress off the shelf, and second normal sheets will fit good, and they’re reasonably comfortable. Nevermind the convenience.

Anonymous boat company says FUCK that, we will design the mattress to fit the boat. Ideally we want them to be 2’ wide and 8’ long. By no means is it a space issue either!

John-rie is absolute junk IMHO. If they fixed their control panels so they could be operated by a human I’d talk a little less shit but hope to never deal with one on a regular basis. I could go on and on about specifics but can’t let the cat out of the bag.


#30

[QUOTE=z-drive;163194]Here’s a good one: when you build a boat, and it comes time to design the rooms a normal person would say hey, what size is a standard twin mattress, I am going to design the rooms around that. First it’s cheaper to buy a mattress off the shelf, and second normal sheets will fit good, and they’re reasonably comfortable. Nevermind the convenience.

Anonymous boat company says FUCK that, we will design the mattress to fit the boat. Ideally we want them to be 2’ wide and 8’ long. By no means is it a space issue either![/QUOTE]

All rooms should have queen sized mattresses minimum. In a perfect world we would have a kegerator and/or wine cellar too I guess.

I’ve been working on an older OSV the last couple years, and it’s obvious crew comfort on here was an after thought when it was designed. Cargo deck space and tankage was the priority.


#31

[QUOTE=Shackle;163155]So, you think it’s pretty cool? Sorry Paddy, but its not at all. (nice legs though) If it were rated on the EEDI it would probably rank last. Square bow? No ballast system? Sloped decks? No sound proofing? Navigation and Wheelhouse Management linked to the one and only computer? . . . . . .[/QUOTE]

I’ve heard very similar reports on Harley’s new ATB.

The Crowley 550’s and 650’s are good ATBs, but the 750’s are a disappointment. Maybe they have exceeded the practical size limit for an ATB. Crowley is building more Jones Act tankers; those are a big success.

With subchapter M coming, maybe small tankers are going to become more competitive with large ATBs.


#32

How many of you guys actually share rooms? Just curious.


#33

Im curious to know why the 750’s were a dissapointment? They look pretty awesome.


#34

[QUOTE=catherder;163199]How many of you guys actually share rooms? Just curious.[/QUOTE]

Sometimes…but it is usually with someone opposite watch.


#35

[QUOTE=acesouthcoast;163204]Im curious to know why the 750’s were a dissapointment? They look pretty awesome.[/QUOTE]

So I am told secondhand, higher fuel consumption and slower speed than designed. Vibration and mechanical issues.


#36

At harley the atbs you have your own room, on all the other boats typically the only people to have thier own are the captain and chief.


#37

We all have our own room on this boat. Not ATB. More than 5 crew deckhands or engineer would be doubled up.


#38

What company?


#39

Jonrie winches are junk. I’ve used them both for shipwork & towing & the winches are terrible. Markey or Intercon are the way to go for shipwork or towing.


#40

[QUOTE=acesouthcoast;163204]Im curious to know why the 750’s were a dissapointment? They look pretty awesome.[/QUOTE] Actually, it has more to do with economics and customers than the mentioned mechanical stuff. Years ago Maritrans (Sonat actually) determined that there was a certain size barge that made LOTS more money than all the others. This roughly equated to 175,000 to 250,000. Coincidentally, this is why Maritrans dumped all it’s stuff under 175,000 20 years ago. It WAS making money, just not as much as they calculated was possible with larger units. Crowley just went TOO big, without understanding the risks. The size allowed most dock visits, least draft constraints, and best barrel/mile pay. The problem arose that the sizes over about 185,000 all are over 10,000 GT and require First Class Pilots every where they go, the tugs are over 300gt and requires 3 watch system both above and below decks, and the drafts are all requiring ship berths for docking only. No barge berths (typically) are large enough to fit these large sizes. Then an operator has to start marketing specifically to customers who only have well maintained, dredged and modern docks. (Boy does that cut to the bone at most places!) These 750’s are 325,000. Very few terminals can accommodate them and even less will block a ship out in favor of an ATB. So, in the long run, it appears than an actual ship is more competitive with the equal size ATB as far as marketing, speed, and berth size is concerned. Another oddity in the industry is customers have it in their knoggin that they want to order in multiples of 50. 50,000; 100,000; 150,000; 200,000 thousand. So when a barge is built to 325,000 it throws off the number crunchers a tad. Sounds stupid, but seem to hold true in my years experience. A barge I used to work on had 8 tanks, with the last two being divided un equally. The customers always pitched a fit over cargo placement since the tanks were as opposed to being 25,000 and 25,000 per pair, the last pair were 29,000 and 21,000.) So customers had to juggle the load and/or discharge to fit the tank capacity.