Argentine navy missing sub


#21

Besides the need for oxygen that will run out soon, the sub also needs to maintain temperature, and the ability to remove Carbon Dioxide before it becomes toxin. The water temperature in this area is illustrated at the link below. Crossing my fingers for the crew and their rescue.

https://www.seatemperature.org/


#22

US to the rescue again (hopefully). Other nations have offered help also but haven’t seen any kroners involved.


#23

Did you read the articles in El Litoral? (They translate quite good with Google Translate)
10 different nations are contributing to the rescue effort.


#24

I did and acknowledge the support. Just wanted to point out that the United States of America is usually the backbone of any international catastrophe/accident/incident the world over. Period.


#25

THIS AS UNCONFIRMED - They have moved the search box West and a little North as a result of a Hydroacoustic Anomaly, so that would be good news in regards to depth and closer to the shelf.


#26

doesn’t matter…after a week, the crew is now gone


#27


#28

There would have been no reason for them to navigate into deeper water unless the command assumed that calmer seas, permitting snorkeling, existed in those waters. That is unlikely, and the reality is that the commander, realizing that he was facing a major casualty, would have turned west, into shallow waters to maximize his crew survival.

Interpreting the Argentine Navy’s statement that an “electrical failure” was the casualty onboard, we can assume that a battery casualty occurred, which opens up host of possibilities, from simple electrical failure, to fire, to explosion and loss of water-tight integrity.

If it was the battery that is the issue, then there is also the probability of chlorine gas, Hydrogen buildup and other hazards
that would be affecting the crew at his point. I would not want to be in any of those scenarios.

I would ask that the maritime community pray for those submariners as they fight for their lives…


#29

They’re dead. It’s as simple as that.


#30

Well let’s hope they can find it and , what the chances of a disabled sub being recovered or refloated to the surface for towing to port etc.


#31

Not an encouraging development …


#32

My condolences and support to all the submariners, and the families affected by this event.


#33

The latest from BBC News:


The explosion (or Implosion??) that have been reported was recorded from afar:


#34

The US has a air transportable rescue sub that should be able to mate to any NATO hatch and undoubtably is all ready in south america? I think i read the “explosion” was attributed to something else, Even then, I don’t know if a battery explosion accustic makes a sharp enough wave front to go very far. If it was batteries, could it cause hull failure? and if any crew compartments have chlorine gas in them, how effective can it be removed?


#35

I believe the sounds will be attributed to hull collapse at depth. We will probably never know what caused loss of depth control but I predict that when the wreck is found it will show the pressure hull imploded.

The power of an implosion at depth is astounding. We used to carry flashlight and other small bulbs down on manned submersibles just for grins (it got really boring on a 90 minute trip to the bottom at 1800m) and when they imploded it was like a gunshot or explosion. The risk of damage created by anything larger than a small bulb was too great to play with.

The delay in releasing acoustic information is probably related to not wanting to give away too much about the capabilities of modern acoustic surveillance systems. I doubt there is much that is not known about this event.


#36

I believe the US rescue sub has already been deployed and placed on board either Skandi Patagonia or Sophia Siem in readiness for when the sub is located:
http://gcaptain.com/explosions-heard-near-missing-argentine-sub/?goal=0_f50174ef03-33f3dac3fc-169863069&mc_cid=33f3dac3fc&mc_eid=4674ba0fbe


#37

You provide no support and nobody cares about your condolences


#38

You forgot “Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.”


#39

did you see this bit in that article?

According to naval commander Gabriel Galeazzi, the submarine surfaced and reported the breakdown, which Capt Galeazzi described as a “short circuit” in the sub’s batteries.

The sub was ordered to cut its mission short and return to the naval base in Mar del Plata immediately.

According to Capt Balbi, the captain of the ARA San Juan contacted the naval base once more after reporting the problem.

In the message, he reportedly said that the problem had been adequately fixed and that the sub would submerge and proceed towards Mar del Plata.

The last contact was made at 07:30 local time (10:30 GMT) on Wednesday 15 November. It is not known what happened to the sub after that contact.

so you’ve suffered an electrical casualty severe enough for the brass to order the boat to return to port forthwith yet you submerge? here we have another SHEER GENIUS to rival those in our own Navee! must have been an Annapolis exchange student?


#40

“The Argentinean navy has insisted a missing submarine was in good condition and had passed system safety checks before setting off on a training mission 10 days ago.”

A lot of different voices are calling out an alleged poor state of equipment readiness of the ARA San Juan. I’m not sure of the state of finances of the Armada de la República Argentina, but I know that many Western navies are facing a crippling shortfall in readiness budgets, often sending out patched-together hulls manned with crews stretched to their limits.

What happened here?