Anybody heard of the Coast Guard granting license exemptions?


#1

I had a conversation with someone about a job on a 300-ton vessel. The vessel used to require a 500-ton master and two 500-ton mates licenses.

The vessel could not afford to pay market rate for 500-ton licenses. So the Coast Guard approved the boat for operation with 200-ton licenses.

I’m so glad I spent all that money on those STCW courses.


#2

The license is just a piece of TP to our friends at the CG.
How do you explain former CG getting their orginal Unlimited Masters license? They suddenly have the tonnage? Are they competent to stand a basic open ocean sea watch, I don’t think so.
Then they give away commemorative Unlimited Licenses to politicians. So I want a CG Captain certificate! I know I can stand a sea watch and don’t need 14 people to help.
The rules can be bent in other words.
Stalin said, “It is not who wins the election as it is who controls the ballot box.” In this case they control the license issuing and how it is applied no matter how arbitrary.


#3

I’ve seen several “vessel specific” licenses over the years. The first one I’d heard of was when the tug Sunshine State was welded it’s barge. Mobil had a few on their seismic ships and I’ve seen several off the dredges in the last few years.


#4

[quote=Captmad;8909]The license is just a piece of TP to our friends at the CG.
How do you explain former CG getting their orginal Unlimited Masters license? They suddenly have the tonnage? Are they competent to stand a basic open ocean sea watch, I don’t think so. [/quote]

Surely you are not arguing that the Coast Guard does not do open ocean patrols on vessels with sufficient tonnage to qualify for an unlimited license (in which many, like myself stood years of open ocean sea watches), doesn’t count.


#5

Who gets what license is not a concern as much as how long it is taking to get a renewal done right now. So far 3 months and my renewal status is at the MEB evaluation stage. That’s pitiful!!! My last renewal only took 5 weeks.


#6

I think it goes for all the sea services…time spent underway gets credited towards Merchant Marine officer licenses which is spelled out in 46CFR10.213.

Right or wrong…time spent in command is creditable towards an unlimited tonnage master’s ticket which I believe goes back for decades. Since naval vessels don’t have gross tonnages, I do not know how the USCG determines a tonnage equivalency? I’ve never seen a NVIC or NMC letter on the subject. Maybe someone else here knows?

Regarding vessel specific licenses, I thought that STCW '95 had put an end to the USCG issuing those. I know they were not uncommon in the 80’s but I can’t recall the last time I ran across someone with one?


#7

Robert, One of the questions a Master asks another upon joining a ship and discussing watch mates, “How is he in traffic?”. Open sea watches are where the mates learn equipment and do their mental planning.
My concern is how the man will react in traffic situations etc. This only comes through experience. The other concern is adhering to my own STCW rest period as well. So in other words am I going to be up all night babysitting?

Then if you feel qualified when was the last time a CG Cutter had to deal with cargo? Stability, over stowage, ballast, trim, cargo compatibility issues etc all at the same time? So why do these retired CG feel they are qualified to sail in the CM capacity let alone as Master? Comparing apples to oranges perhaps…


#8

[quote=Captmad;8925]Robert, One of the questions a Master asks another upon joining a ship and discussing watch mates, “How is he in traffic?”. Open sea watches are where the mates learn equipment and do their mental planning.
My concern is how the man will react in traffic situations etc. This only comes through experience. The other concern is adhering to my own STCW rest period as well. So in other words am I going to be up all night babysitting?

Then if you feel qualified when was the last time a CG Cutter had to deal with cargo? Stability, over stowage, ballast, trim, cargo compatibility issues etc all at the same time? So why do these retired CG feel they are qualified to sail in the CM capacity let alone as Master? Comparing apples to oranges perhaps…[/quote]

Do you somehow think that the Coast Guard manages to operate when not in traffic?

You are right about the other significant issues regarding cargo, etc, but former Coast Guard people don’t just get a license dropped in their laps, they still have to test that they prove they have the requisite knowledge. As a side note, those us of from the buoy tender community have experience in cargo loading and stability issues, I can assure you, although obviously not at the level of a cargo or container ship.


#9

Robert- Buoy tenders in the Gulf of Alaska! God bless you. There is one underfunded mission of our CG.

When I refer to traffic (converging at 20+ knots) I meant: the areas of Japan, China, Singapore, Red Sea, Gibraltar, English Channel… Do you have experience in these areas? Anyways with your experience imagine you will do well in a 3M or 2M capacity with guidance. If you have not sailed in these capacities yet.

Good luck in your endeavors.


#10

[quote=Captmad;8930]Robert- Buoy tenders in the Gulf of Alaska! God bless you. There is one underfunded mission of our CG.

When I refer to traffic (converging at 20+ knots) I meant: the areas of Japan, China, Singapore, Red Sea, Gibraltar, English Channel… Do you have experience in these areas? Anyways with your experience imagine you will do well in a 3M or 2M capacity with guidance. If you have not sailed in these capacities yet.

Good luck in your endeavors.[/quote]

Ever been through Hell Gate on a full moon?

Nemo


#11

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#12

[quote=Capt. Nemo;8933]Ever been through Hell Gate on a full moon?

Nemo[/quote]

Or try the Seymour Narrows at slack.