Another Military Sealift Command thread


#261

Just to clear up the shore leave. You get two days for every month assigned to a ship. Under three years gov’t service is 13 days annual leave. 3-15 years is 20 days and over 15 is 26 days per year.

[QUOTE=Knots;162200]What does paid vacation time have to do with 60 days leave without pay. There has been absolutely ZERO announcement on that written or verbal within MSC.

Your wiper buddy is not a source.

Under 3 years service you get 4 hours paid leave every 2 weeks worked
and 1 day shore leave for each 15 days worked (not while in training)

AB’s have 2-3 months training and neo before they even deploy, so count on a minimum of 7 months away your very first hitch with one month off until you leave again.

If anything they have cracked down on people abusing the sick leave. They are running people home without pay if they are not fit for duty. The pool is really only slackers no one wants and not fit for duty personel.[/QUOTE]


#262

I’ll definitely have some thinking to do. I like the schedule and crew here. Was on this boat before for a hitch so I got right back into it so it’s not completely new. I appreciate the input. I’ve always wanted to travel the world working at sea but not sure if this is the time to gamble when and where I’ll end up as I’m looking to work on getting my mate and eventually master of towing and being on a tug will get me there.


#263

[QUOTE=boston87;162210]I’ll definitely have some thinking to do. I like the schedule and crew here…[/QUOTE] You have to consider the big picture. You will have to take the bad with the good. Of course I loved pulling into the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, ect. But I am single. If your married and have all that stuff around you, your marriage could go out the window. Being in Sasabo ,Japan can be quite boring. I was stuck on a ship in Chinhae ,Korea for weeks, then out to sea for weeks after that. That place has absolutely nothing happening after 7pm. So much for the world travel. There are always people rotating in and out, so you will working with/for complete jerks and idiots, along with some dedicated and professional sailors. You may get stuck on a ship where the Captain limits overtime.
The trifecta can go either way: great schedule, lots of OT and cool people around you. The other side: working for that supervisor you hate, horrible port visits and limited OT.


#264

I’d greatly appreciate some input on MSC as I was just interviewed and told I was being recommended for hire. My questions:

What are the odds of my getting into the Rescue Swimmer training? I’m able to meet or exceed all the fitness minimums, but surely they have only a certain number of spots for that duty?

Would I be holding a needle-gun for four months straight (I’d be an OS) or actually standing navigational watches/doing nautical shit? What’s a typical day like?

What’s the food like?

What do you wish you would’ve known before you joined?

A thousand thanks in advance for your shared knowledge!


#265

[QUOTE=Dano;162328]
Would I be holding a needle-gun for four months straight (I’d be an OS) or actually standing navigational watches/doing nautical shit?
[/QUOTE]

Silly boy, holding a needle gun [B]is[/B] “nautical shit” for an OS.


#266

I am single which is why I originally leaned towards MSC. I just don’t want to get there and lose my spot here and screw myself and on the other hand I don’t want to pass up the opportunity and end up liking it so we’ll see. I know it’s a toss up but I’ll accept the offer and start the process and make my decision during the waiting period as I do some more digging. I appreciate all your help and any additional info about even little details about how it is working there would be greatly appreciated


#267

[QUOTE=Knots;162200]What does paid vacation time have to do with 60 days leave without pay. There has been absolutely ZERO announcement on that written or verbal within MSC.

Your wiper buddy is not a source.

Under 3 years service you get 4 hours paid leave every 2 weeks worked
and 1 day shore leave for each 15 days worked (not while in training)

AB’s have 2-3 months training and neo before they even deploy, so count on a minimum of 7 months away your very first hitch with one month off until you leave again.

If anything they have cracked down on people abusing the sick leave. They are running people home without pay if they are not fit for duty. The pool is really only slackers no one wants and not fit for duty personel.[/QUOTE]

I am also not sure why he brought up vacation time when we were discussing LWOP. What I am sure of is that it sounds like there are disconnects between office personnel and operations, which is pretty much par for the course in every company.

I am really excited about the opportunity. However I am hoping to get some kind of break between NEO/Training and when having to report for a ship/pool. Do you know if this is possible or am I dreaming?


#268

[QUOTE=Knots;162200]Your wiper buddy is not a source…[/QUOTE] 60 days of leave is available, so beg to differ with YOUR source. Some people love to show the world how smart they are. Be prepared to get on your hands and knees to get that much time off. Especially if the pool is light loaded.

[QUOTE=Dano;162328]I’d greatly appreciate some input on MSC as I was just interviewed and told I was being recommended for hire. [/QUOTE]

Rescue swimmers get paid OT just to go work out. Good luck. Be prepared to eat a lot of carbs, and “Fill foods” Like casserole, potato, ect. Also count on a lot of Philippine dishes. Deck is either watchstanders or day workers. Watchstanders stand watches on the gangway inport or at the helm underway. Day workers do the chipping and painting.
Count on no time off, LWOP or whatever you want to call it after NEO. MSC (PM1) is a quasi military outfit. Horrible service from Norfolk, non returning of emails and phone calls is the norm.


#269

[QUOTE=boston87;162174]I just received an email telling me I was selected. Applied for AB about 2 months ago. I haven’t heard too many good reviews and I got a job as an AB not long after and am currently a tug in Florida doing 4/2 week schedule. If anyone has any input as to whether it’d be worth it in the long haul or not. I like my job now but if it isn’t as bad as I hear and may be worth it I’d like to know what I’m getting myself into before I give this up.[/QUOTE]

Long haul: Joined MSC as AB Limited at 58yo. Retired from gov’t service 5 yrs later at 62 as AB Unlimited. My detailer OK’d me to update the STCW training after I signed off my last ship, so that’s valid until 2018. Left MSC with >100K in my TSP (gov’t 401k) and about half that in my checking acct, all the while paying rent, car ins. and all other bills when away at sea. My health ins is paid by the gov’t for life. Still sailing. You sound like a young guy with good goals, so YMMV.

There are good ships and better ships. If you want to have a blast and see ports that no other vessels visit, work with Navy divers, both stand watch and do day work with lots of OT get yourself on an ARS. Watch out for Cpt. Peter Long. He’s a dick, but he’ll respect you if you do a good job aboard.


#270

Just called them to check on my medical and physical and told me I had to lower my cholesterol down and was not fit for duty it was to high for them hopefully I can get it lowered so I can work for them, they said I walked funny at the physical to which was weird too ?


#271

I’m wondering how many “professional” mariners these days could actually go out alone in a boat – let’s say a 45’ sloop – and make an open-water transit of even 500 miles. I’m guessing not many. Seems like the field is rife with guys who think they’re tough if they can work themselves into an early grave, or a repetitive use injury, or a big paycheck in lieu of any kind of meaningful social relationship. Dumb fucks, in other words.


#272

[QUOTE=txwooley;162334]Silly boy, holding a needle gun [B]is[/B] “nautical shit” for an OS.[/QUOTE]

I’m wondering how many “professional” mariners these days could actually go out alone in a boat – let’s say a 45’ sloop – and make an open-water transit of even 500 miles. I’m guessing not many. Seems like the field is rife with guys who think they’re tough if they can work themselves into an early grave, or a repetitive use injury, or a big paycheck in lieu of any kind of meaningful social relationship. Dumb fucks, in other words.


#273

[QUOTE=Dano;162464]I’m wondering how many “professional” mariners these days could actually go out alone in a boat – let’s say a 45’ sloop – and make an open-water transit of even 500 miles. I’m guessing not many. Seems like the field is rife with guys who think they’re tough if they can work themselves into an early grave, or a repetitive use injury, or a big paycheck in lieu of any kind of meaningful social relationship. Dumb fucks, in other words.[/QUOTE]

How many “professional mariners” on their 45’ sloops making solo open water transits have had the CG and merchant mariners rescue their “professional” asses? Answer: too many.


#274

I would strongly question the professionalism of anyone that would set off on a 500 mile open water transit solo. There are many threads already addressing this.

And what “meaningful social relationship” is achieved on a solo open-water jaunt of any length? You getting to know your alter-egos?


#275

So what you are saying is you should go straight to a Master’s position?


#276

Idiots abound. At least they’re - our hypothetical solo sailor - not in charge of other human lives or million-dollar equipment belonging to someone else. Question: how many lives are lost due to incompetence on the part of “professional” mariners like the captains of the Costa Concordia or that Korean ferry? Answer: more in one year than the total number of single-handers who’ve ever had to make a mayday call.


#277

[QUOTE=injunear;162465]How many “professional mariners” on their 45’ sloops making solo open water transits have had the CG and merchant mariners rescue their “professional” asses? Answer: too many.[/QUOTE]

Idiots abound. At least they’re - our hypothetical solo sailor - not in charge of other human lives or million-dollar equipment belonging to someone else. Question: how many lives are lost due to incompetence on the part of “professional” mariners like the captains of the Costa Concordia or that Korean ferry? Answer: more in one year than the total number of single-handers who’ve ever had to make a*mayday call.

      • Updated - - -

[QUOTE=Bayrunner;162474]So what you are saying is you should go straight to a Master’s position?[/QUOTE]

No, I’m saying training should consist of more than just seeing how long a guy can chip paint.

      • Updated - - -

[QUOTE=txwooley;162473]I would strongly question the professionalism of anyone that would set off on a 500 mile open water transit solo. There are many threads already addressing this.

And what “meaningful social relationship” is achieved on a solo open-water jaunt of any length? You getting to know your alter-egos?[/QUOTE]

You need some reading comprehension classes, little buddy.


#278

Is anyone’s profile still “Under Review”? Mine has been under review since January.


#279

[QUOTE=txwooley;162473]And what “meaningful social relationship” is achieved on a solo open-water jaunt of any length? [/QUOTE]

Probably none, unless your name is Moitessier.


#280

those clowns weren’t professionals. There’s a big difference between a true professional and someone who plays the part, faking it their whole career.