A Mari Usque Ad Mare Ad Mare


#1


(the on-topic place to talk about the arctic and arctic sovereignty)


#2

Interesting stuff in here: http://lswilson.dewlineadventures.com/dewline.htm


#3

[QUOTE=Lee Shore;189950]Interesting stuff in here: http://lswilson.dewlineadventures.com/dewline.htm[/QUOTE]

I’ve never fallen down this particular rabbit hole before. Turns out to be a Carlsbad Caverns of rabbit holes, complete with bats. What I find weird is, you can’t see most of these places on the satellite photos. Landing strips, helicopter pads, buildings foundations, docks… Are the coordinates wrong?


#4

We got good news and bad news.

Bad news first. Remeber that I said that Hay River is the only port left in the North now that Churchill has closed? Well, not anymore. We are fresh out. NTCL is going out of business.

Good news now. All of this is for sale.

Once in a lifetime opportunity to buy a fleet, complete with crews, customers, and the eternal gratitude of people who like groceries, fuel, and toilet paper. Direct your inquiries here:
http://www.ntcl.com/inquiries-regarding-the-sale-of-ntcl-and-its-assets/


#5

Isn’t Hay River too far from the northern passage to be of any strategic use? And landlocked on Great Slave Lake? Have you figured out why the coordinates don’t match?


#6

[QUOTE=Lee Shore;189984]Isn’t Hay River too far from the northern passage to be of any strategic use? And landlocked on Great Slave Lake? Have you figured out why the coordinates don’t match?[/QUOTE]

The lake isn’t landlocked. It’s drained by that great big ol’ navigable river. Is St. Louis landlocked?

I’ve been trying to figure out what those great big radial patterns are in the ground north of the landing strip in Resolute. I think they’re the ground plain part of a broadside radio antenna. I eyeballed the length to be something like 160 m, and so I guess it’s after something like 480 KHz, which isn’t weird at all. It’s only weird that I never noticed any other antennae like this before. They aught to be relatively common, right? I wonder if Resolute was one of the data collection points for DEW and what I’m looking at is the antenna to talk to the other stations/Cheyenne Mountain. Do you see them on google maps satellite view? One on each side of the road?

Edit: The issue with the coordinates is this: the decommissioned sites reference a coordinate at a nearby place, like a village or the centre of an island. For some of them the resolution on the satellite photo is good enough that with patience, you can find the old site. The active sites seem to have good coordinates. Resolute is quite far North of the active stations, so maybe it’s antenna or whatever it is isn’t to do with DEW.


#7

gee!, you don’t think the usa will continue to rely on sat comm via chinese sattelites etc. during the next ‘conflict’? I wouldn’t think they’d use a omni directional antenna for comm to cheyenne, it’d take terra watts during emp. maybe it’s for submarines? a couple hundred watts on 40 or 80 meters, a long wire and cw would suffice though the data xfer would be sorta slow!


#8

I don’t think they had satcom in the 1950s. Maybe with a good ionosphere bounce or two? But it is a good frequency for submarines, I guess. I don’t know what they are. I’m only guessing. I know you push the button to talk and let it go to listen. That’s all I know about radios.


#9

[QUOTE=Emrobu;189991]The lake isn’t landlocked. It’s drained by that great big ol’ navigable river. Is St. Louis landlocked?[/QUOTE]

Well ok. The Mackenzie River. Hay River to Tuk is over 1200 klicks as the crow flies, maybe twice that following the river. What size ships ships can actually travel the river between those two points? In any case, it’s too far to be considered a practical part of the Northwest Passage, is it not?


#10

[QUOTE=Lee Shore;190013]Well ok. The Mackenzie River. Hay River to Tuk is over 1200 klicks as the crow flies, maybe twice that following the river. What size ships ships can actually travel the river between those two points? In any case, it’s too far to be considered a practical part of the Northwest Passage, is it not?[/QUOTE]

It isn’t part of the northwest passage, but it’s good to have a place to keep the boats in the winter, and a base to do maintenance, etc. also, people live up there. That’s the best way to move food, trucks, snowmobiles, fuel, library books, livestock (maybe?), and generators. You can truck it to Hay River, then deliver it anywhere by boat. Or used to be you could. If you’re going to have SAR, tugs, pilots, pollution response, and that kind of thing available for breakup, you might think that Hay River is a good base.

If you’re curious about the kinds of traffic that the river takes, check out this fleet: http://www.ntcl.com/operations/fleet/. Beauty, right? Can you believe it’s for sale? Such a deal.

Until recently, there was also a B&B style river cruise that was much loved. I’m sorry that I never got a chance to do that before the owners retired to tropical Alberta.

http://www.nnsl.com/frames/newspapers/2008-08/aug25_08csh.html


#11

Tropical Alberta, you funny. I was in Cold Lake once. Charming little town.


#12

This would solve the sealift problem and then some.


#13

[QUOTE=Emrobu;190044]This would solve the sealift problem and then some.

http://www.myyellowknifenow.com/15219/airship-manufacturer-pitches-idea-to-nwt-cabinet-in-hay-river/[/QUOTE]

They got some left to do before venturing into the NWT: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/aug/24/worlds-biggest-aircraft-crashes-bedfordshire-airlander-10


#14

[QUOTE=ombugge;190053]They got some left to do before venturing into the NWT: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/aug/24/worlds-biggest-aircraft-crashes-bedfordshire-airlander-10[/QUOTE]

“Dammit Bernoulli. You had one job.”


#15

Or you can do the Arctic like the Americans do.


#16

[QUOTE=Emrobu;190190]Or you can do the Arctic like the Americans do.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/wwii-era-arctic-military-base-polluting-greenland-1.3756786[/QUOTE]

What about exposing the presents of atomic wast left behind on Greenland as well?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ujx_pND9wg
Did any of this removed when the camp was closed?

Greenland is now “free” thanks to the American largeness, or is it the other way around?


#17

[QUOTE=ombugge;190201]What about exposing the presents of atomic wast left behind on Greenland as well?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ujx_pND9wg
Did any of this removed when the camp was closed?

Greenland is now “free” thanks to the American largeness, or is it the other way around?[/QUOTE]

Yup. The reactor was removed. They left the sewage and the cooling-water, though.

Camp Century is an interesting one. The American Government told the Danes and the American people that it was research station, but it was meant to be a base from which they could install nuclear missile and their launching systems. Luckily they were also doing some good science. The data that were gathered at Camp Century allowed us to figure out how fast glaciers move (which turns out to be a tricky, non-intuitive process to understand). As they figured out, you can’t build permanent sub-ice structures, because the ice flows in complicated ways, which prevented the nukes from getting installed.

But the sewage and the cooling water is still a problem.


#18

More Arcticy stuff…

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/searchers-find-2nd-ship-from-doomed-british-expedition/ar-AAiOQYh?li=BBnb7Kz


#19

[QUOTE=Lee Shore;190243]More Arcticy stuff…

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/searchers-find-2nd-ship-from-doomed-british-expedition/ar-AAiOQYh?li=BBnb7Kz[/QUOTE]

So cool. CBC says all the masts are still vertical and all the hatches are still closed.


#20

[QUOTE=Lee Shore;190243]More Arcticy stuff…

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/searchers-find-2nd-ship-from-doomed-british-expedition/ar-AAiOQYh?li=BBnb7Kz[/QUOTE]

Since the bay she was found in was named Terror Bay, I would have thought that would be the first place they would look for the wreck of “Terror”.
It is obviously not a place frequently visited if nobody had noticed a mast(One?)sticking up above water until a few years ago.

An even more detailed article w/video found on theguardian.com: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/sep/12/hms-terror-wreck-found-arctic-nearly-170-years-northwest-passage-attempt